Tuesday, September 8th, 2015


After Burma’s president signed off on the last of four controversial bills collectively known as the “race and religion protection laws” last month, Ma Ba Tha, the Buddhist nationalist group that first introduced the legislative package, has announced plans for a nationwide celebration.
(more…)

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has repatriated 105 Burmese migrant workers, the first of some 364 nationals stranded in Indonesia. Other reports have put the number of returned nationals as up to 107.
(more…)

A stupa that a Buddhist monk was inspired by a dream to build inside the compound of a Baptist church is to be destroyed under the orders of the minister of religious affairs.
(more…)

President Thein Sein did not engage in discussion about the Myitsone dam project when he met with China Power Investment Corporation (CPI) during his visit to China, says Information Minister and Presidential Spokesman Ye Htut.
(more…)

Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi kicked off campaigning for the first free general election since the end of military rule saying it would be a crucial turning point and called on the global community to monitor the outcome.
(more…)

Burmese opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi will take her election battle straight to one of the president’s closest allies when campaigning gets under way this week for the first free general election since the end of military rule.
(more…)

Red tape and confusion prevented all but a few thousand of more than two million Myanmar citizens working overseas to sign up to vote in the first free elections since the end of military rule, leaving the vast majority without a voice.
(more…)

Just five years ago, when Aung San Suu Kyi was still under house arrest, she commented that one day she hoped to get a Twitter account and chat with the outside world.
(more…)

Body Burma’s main opposition party lodged a complaint with the country’s electoral commission on Monday, accusing its primary opponent in the Nov. 8 general election, the ruling Union Solidarity and Development Party (USDP), of having engaged in vote-buying.
(more…)

Ma Thandar, an esteemed Burmese activist and the widow of a journalist killed in the custody of the Burma Army last year, will seek election to the Lower House of Burma’s Parliament as a member of the main opposition party.
(more…)

An independent candidate at the centre of a vote-buying scandal has lodged a formal complaint against National League for Democracy leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi, alleging a recent “voter education” event in Nay Pyi Taw breached campaign rules.
(more…)

A Union government minister has been cleared to stand for election despite claims that he fails to meet citizenship criteria.
(more…)

The Government announced on Monday that it will spend K26 billion (US$20.3 million) on building low cost housing for workers in industrial zones the Global New Light of Myanmar reported on 7 September.
(more…)

The difference between the official and the market exchange rates may have largely closed, but the black market in currency exchange persists.
(more…)

Students at the Yangon Technological University (YTU) in Myanmar were recently given access to the extensive library of economic reports on emerging markets produced by the global publishing, research and consultancy firm Oxford Business Group (OBG) according to a media release on 7 September.
(more…)

A multi-million dollar deal to resettle refugees from an Australia-run detention camp on the Pacific nation of Nauru to Cambodia has been irreparably damaged by a Rohingya refugee’s decision to go home to Burma, the opposition and refugee advocates said on Tuesday.
(more…)

With Burma’s general election just two months away, there is one simple question on nearly everyone’s mind: Who will be the winner? But as with many questions in Burma, the answer is rarely as simple as one might hope.
(more…)

Campaigning kicked off Tuesday for Myanmar’s Nov. 8 general election, which is expected to be the Southeast Asian country’s most credible vote in more than a half-century. A long-ruling junta made way for a civilian government more than four years ago, but the military still retains a powerful role, and political and economic reforms have been stymied by persistent ethnic strife and natural disasters. Associated Press writers based across Asia who have covered Myanmar for many years outline the key issues at stake:
(more…)

The peace process started out on an unsure footing in August 2011. Though the process is still fragile four years later, the prospect for peace is optimistic; a nationwide ceasefire agreement is imminent.
(more…)

On 9 September the top leaders of the Ethnic Armed Organisations (EAOs) and the three senior most negotiators representing the country’s ethnic alliance of 17 organisations, known as the United Nationalities Federation Council (UNFC), will travel to Naypyidaw to meet with Burmese President Thein Sein and military leaders to press for a genuinely inclusive ceasefire agreement that will have a truly positive impact nationwide.
(more…)

Next Page »