Other


While most Australians were happily tucking into bacon and eggs on Saturday morning, Jade Horrobin was finishing off the last of her week’s rations.
(more…)

An openly gay man who is the subject of a new documentary in Myanmar on Wednesday welcomed its inclusion in an ongoing film festival in the country, but warned that human rights violations still regularly occur in the former military dictatorship, despite its rapid transition to democracy in recent years according to RFA on 17 June.
(more…)

Burma’s opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi began a five-day visit to China on Wednesday, the first time the National League for Democracy chairwoman has made an official trip to Burma’s northern neighbor.
(more…)

I have been a supporter of Burma’s democracy movement since 1993. For most of that time, the prospect of change seemed remote, and I felt increasingly discouraged.
(more…)

In the past week, my Facebook thread has been replete with posts about a group of people who until now has failed to make it to general public awareness: Rohingya. Ordinary individuals, who before have never even heard of the name, are expressing outrage at the “maritime pingpong” of around 6,000 Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants who have been adrift in the Andaman Sea—starving and drinking their own urine in unseaworthy boats or “floating coffins”.
(more…)

“They can imprison my body, but never my mind,” U Nay Myo Zin told us just before police led him into the Dagon township courtroom last week.
(more…)

Rohingya and Bangladeshi migrants on board a foundering vessel off Indonesia fought with axes, knives and metal bars in vicious clashes that left at least 100 dead, survivors said as they recovered from their ordeal.
(more…)

Thousands of Bangladeshis and ethnic Rohingya from Myanmar are seeking refuge after the rickety boats they were fleeing on were abandoned by human traffickers caught up in a recent dragnet. Many have been taken into temporary camps in Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, but those countries have grown reluctant to take on more, with aid agencies estimating that several boats remain on the waters between Thailand and Indonesia. Here’s a look at the current crisis by the numbers.
(more…)

Sitting in a bamboo hut in a filthy wasteland of southeast Delhi, Mohammed Salim Ullah, a stateless Rohingya, seemed unaware of the crisis facing members of his community stranded in Southeast Asian waters.
(more…)

The next general election, scheduled for late this year, is not shaping up to be the benchmark of democratic consolidation that many Myanmar observers had hoped. The government, which is still largely controlled by senior military officers, has failed to strike a power-sharing agreement with either the mainstream opposition or ethnic armed resistance groups. Not only does this endanger the legitimacy of the election, it also exposes a dangerous leadership vacuum within both the government and the opposition. (more…)

Burma’s Rohingya face an existential threat — and we must not look away.

Driving through Sittwe, the dusty provincial capital of Rahkine state in northwest Burma, you notice a small poster affixed to nearly every shop and home. In English these signs read “white card,” and they alert anyone passing by that the building’s occupant sides with recent government efforts to prevent Burma’s most threatened ethnic and religious minority group, the Rohingya, from participating in the upcoming national elections. Most of Burma’s Rohingya are, in fact, stateless, and “white card” refers to the special identity documents issued to them by the government in lieu of the papers held by Burmese citizens. A few months ago officials decided that white card holders would not be allowed to participate in the national vote scheduled for this fall — effectively excluding the overwhelming majority of Rohingya. (more…)

Thousands of Myanmar’s Rohingya Muslims have been fleeing persecution at home, and now their refugee boats are being turned away by neighboring countries, leaving them stranded at sea. Others had been locked up in jungle camps in Thailand. An untold number have died of starvation, sickness and abuse.
(more…)

Thousands of people, both Muslim Rohingyas fleeing persecution in Myanmar and Bangladeshis seeking jobs in Malaysia, have been abandoned at sea recently in Southeast Asia by smugglers fearing arrest as Thailand cracks down on human traffickers. At least 8,000 people are in peril, yet the Southeast Asian nations off whose shores they drift have been reluctant to save them.
(more…)

Around 1,600 refugees from Myanmar and Bangladesh were rescued off the coast of Indonesia on Sunday and detained in Malaysia on Monday. (more…)

Myanmar is undergoing a historic transition. After decades of armed conflict and economic stagnation, the country is beginning to make important strides toward realising its potential and the aspirations of its people.
(more…)

Sitting at his home in Taunggyi, 100-year-old U Khan is still proud of what he did for Gen. Aung San, the father of Burma’s independence, on Feb. 12, 1947.
(more…)

Once again, Myanmar has been rocked by student demonstrations and, once again, the authorities have reacted with force, to the extent of using hired thugs in Yangon to beat and drag protesters away. (more…)

The sun is sinking into the Rangoon River, one of lower Burma’s main waterways. It is dotted with small boats on their way to dusky moorings. Arkar Min, 21, rides a water taxi with seven men, all of them silent. They’ve spent the day hauling fish into trucks. Now they rest against one another, backs between knees, arms around shoulders, heads on laps, lulled by the rhythmic thump of the engine. (more…)

Whether it is a disappearing umbrella, a questionable dinner party for the well connected, a fake rape report, the wrong wrecked motorcycle, or a ‘hip’ Buddha graphic in poor taste, if it is put online in Myanmar, eager netizens will soon be circulating it throughout the nation and around the world. That’s the nature of the medium.
(more…)

School was a bust for San Mon Aung, a well-to-do kid growing up in the aftermath of Burma’s 1988 uprising. It was all palm juice, card games and women, he said, not enough to satisfy his intellectual ambitions.
(more…)

Next Page »